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As early as the late 1990's, San Francisco based coach-builder SV Motor Company envisioned a car that took the raw performance of a Corvette and refined it with a touch of Italian flair.  Their vision was to infuse many of the design elements found in the Alfa Romeo 8C Competizione (from which the SV 9 clearly drew its inspiration, as well as its name) with a 2009 Chevy Corvette.
C6 Corvette LS7 7.0L Engine
GM’s was on mission to engineer a Corvette that built upon the line’s performance legacy. By all indications, this is a mission that was fulfilled. The Corvette’s engine bay was host to several outstanding powerplants during the C6’s run. From the base 6.0-liter LS2 to the ZR1’s beastly 6.2-liter LS9, the C6-era was never short on performance. Corvette finally caught up to European brands.
The Callaway C16 was Callaway’s 16th major automotive project. It was a limited production, bespoke automobile, built to order, by what the Press called “the best specialist engineers in the business”. These cars are seriously fast, beautiful, and exclusive. The C16 was a direct competitor for the Porsche GT3, the Lamborghini Murcielago, the Ferrari 599 GTB. It was both faster and more capable than its competitors, at less cost.
Corvette GT3 C6 Z06-R
During the summer of 2005, a decision was made to transform selected Z06 road cars into a new breed of racer to compete in the world's top GT3 championships. The first series to introduce this new GT3 class was the SRO and FIA's GT3 Championship. Based on their racetrack test results, Team Carsport saw instant potential in the car. Hezemans contracted Callaway Competition in conjunction with Koos Pettinga, manager at Corvette Europe, to convert the street Z06 into a Z06R GT3.
Corvette C6R
The Corvette C6-R race car debuted at the 12 Hours of Sebring in March 2005. The two-car, factory-backed Chevrolet sports car program competed in the production-based GT1 class (formerly GTS) of American Le Mans Series as well as the legendary 24 Hours of Le Mans in France. It was the most technically advanced sports car ever developed by GM, culling years of experience from the Corvette C5-R as well as the advancements brought forth from the next-gen Corvette C6 and Z06.
Based on the Corvette Z06, this new GTR also represents a collaboration between Specter Werkes and Lingenfelter Performance Engineering, with a Lingenfelter twin-turbo system powering the car – and pumping its 7.0-liter LS7 engine to 800 horsepower. Featuring dramatic bodywork and carbon fiber details, the GTR blends racing-inspired design cues with uncompromising luxury and performance.
Chevrolet introduced the limited production Competition Sport package for both the 2009 Corvette coupe and the Z06, bringing the look of Corvette's racing team to their non-ZR1 offerings, if not quite the performance. Both the Z06 and Coupe 1LT Vettes ordered with the Competition Sport package will get a track focus, which includes...
2009 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1
The ZR-1 returned with the 1990 Corvette lineup after an eighteen year hiatus.  This time, it featured a special LT5 engine that had been developed by Lotus (which, at the time, had been a subsidiary of General Motors.) The LT5 engine featured an all-aluminum block, four overhead camshafts, and 32 valves. It also featured an air management system which enabled the car to maintain proper operation while closing off half of its fuel injection system.
Built exclusively for Hertz Rental Car, the Corvette ZHZ coupe was first introduced in 2008 as part of Hertz’s “Fun Collection.”  These Corvettes were part of a larger group of rental vehicles made up of cars like the Ford Mustang, the Nissan 350Z and the Shelby GT-H. The intent behind these rental cars was simple - provide consumers with an opportunity to rent (at a rate commensurate with the car's performance) a well-equipped sports car for a day, a weekend or even longer.