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The Corvette C5-R was part of a plan by General Motors and their Chevrolet brand to create a factory team to participate in grand touring races not only in North America, but also elsewhere in the world, most notably at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. GM had previously been against approving factory support for Corvette racing programs, although the IMSA GT Championship's Corvette GTPs had seen some support until they ended competition in 1989.
2004 Corvette Sales Brochures
A special Commemorative Edition, recognizing the Le Mans successes, was available for 2004. It consisted of a LeMans blue paint with silver / red center striping, Commemorative badges on the front bumper and rear deck, a shale interior with seat embroidery, an emblem on the interior...
Corvette LS6 engine closeup
The LS6, which served as the motivating force behind the 2001-2004 Corvette Z06, bested the prior LS1 in virtually every facet of performance and proved formidable, both on the track and street. Perhaps more importantly, this engine provided a glimpse into the LS platform’s future, and its ability to constantly evolve.
1998 Corvette Pace Car LS1 Engine
When the C5 Corvette was finally unveiled critics were quick to notice a thundering new powerplant. It carried the LS1 designation, serving as the C5 Corvette’s base engine for the duration of the production run. Ironically, the C5 Corvette would only ever leave the factory with one of two individual engines. This included the aforementioned 5.7L LS1, as well as the all-powerful 5.7L LS6, which powered the C5 Z06.
Corvette performed Indianapolis 500 Pace Car duties for a record sixth time. It marks the third consecutive year and 15th time overall that a Chevrolet product has served as the Official Pace Car – the most appearances by any brand. The 2004 Corvette that will serve as the Indy 500 Pace Car is virtually identical to the Convertibles available today through local Chevrolet dealerships.