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Built from 1997 until 2004, the C5 Corvette is considered one of the most reliable. Given its increasing affordability, the C5 offers a lot of power and performance at great value. How its maintained and cared for can dramatically affect the overall quality.
1997 Callaway C12 Corvette Silver
Callaway has built a firm reputation for producing some of the most sophisticated and advanced Corvette-based automobiles. Introduced in 1998, Callaway’s C12 continued this proud legacy. Designed, developed and constructed by two top German engineering and development companies, Callaway and IVM, the C12 was intended as a bespoke, high-performance car that offered its occupants a civilized interior and relaxed ride. One of the most respected Corvette super-cars ever.
Corvette’s decision to become the official pace car of the Rolex 24 Hours at Daytona is a key component of Chevrolet’s strategy to reinforce Corvette’s image as "America’s Performance Icon." Jim Campbell, Corvette brand manager, is responsible for developing this strategy, and he’s the guiding force behind Corvette’s return to the racetrack.
1998 Corvette Pace Car LS1 Engine
When the C5 Corvette was finally unveiled critics were quick to notice a thundering new powerplant. It carried the LS1 designation, serving as the C5 Corvette’s base engine for the duration of the production run. Ironically, the C5 Corvette would only ever leave the factory with one of two individual engines. This included the aforementioned 5.7L LS1, as well as the all-powerful 5.7L LS6, which powered the C5 Z06.
1999 Corvette Sales Brochures
You can download for free this exclusive 1999 Corvette sales brochure for more information about the car. "Powerful drivetrain, balanced chassis, fun to drive... the best Corvette ever, and better value than a 911" - Car and Driver. "A home run in every way". 
The Corvette C5-R was part of a plan by General Motors and their Chevrolet brand to create a factory team to participate in grand touring races not only in North America, but also elsewhere in the world, most notably at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. GM had previously been against approving factory support for Corvette racing programs, although the IMSA GT Championship's Corvette GTPs had seen some support until they ended competition in 1989.